Everyone wants to get a great deal on a new or used car. You know it, your salesperson knows it, and the future generations of your children will probably know it by the time they’re born.

If you dig around on the internet, you’ll find a lot of tips and tricks to negotiate your car’s price. Some of these tips are great, others are… perhaps a bit more abrasive than they need to be. To set the record straight, here are the five things to remember when negotiating a good price on your vehicle.

Be friendly

Someone who’s never purchased a vehicle before may believe car negotiation is like an episode of Shark Tank. But you don’t need to have an advanced understanding of sales to get a good deal. In fact, do you want to know the best first step for getting a good deal? Smile.

Remember, you and your car salesperson are working together to get you the keys to your dream vehicle. Part of my job is to make you feel happy and comfortable inside the dealership. The sooner we can establish a comfortable relationship with each other, the easier it will be for me to track down as many discounts and promotions as I can.

Let us know your price range

The easiest way to try to get a certain price on a car is to ask for it.

Car salespeople aren’t mind readers, much to our chagrin. What might be a good deal to me may still be a bit too pricey for you. If you let me know your price range early on, I’ll know exactly what price to shoot for while you’re in the dealership. I may even dock the price more than I would have originally to fit your needs.

Don’t take Kelley Blue Book at face value

Did you research the car you want on Kelley Blue Book and Edmunds True Market Value? If so, great! I love when my customers are informed! Just make sure to avoid adhering to these online tools unconditionally.

While Kelley Blue Book is often accurate, it’s not always exact. A car may have been selling for cheap during the past season, but that may not be true when you walk in. In most cases, I’ll try to match the price recommendations of Kelley Blue Book. However, if your salesperson is unable to offer that price, unconditionally sticking to it can create unnecessary animosity between the two of you.

Be open to looking at other vehicles

Look, I really want to get you in the car you want for the price you want to pay. Even if I can’t fit your needs exactly, I’ll aim to come as close as possible. In the event I can’t get the price just right, I still might be able to work something out.

If you’re open to other similar vehicles, you can increase the possibility of getting a good deal. Let me know what features you’re looking for, and I can show you everything on our lot that would fit your needs. In some cases, I may find a car that’s a part of a promotion you weren’t even aware of!

Understand that your salesperson wants to get you a good deal

I can’t deny that I sell cars because I want to make money. That said, there’s nothing better for business than leaving you as satisfied as possible.

At the end of the day, I don’t want to only sell you a car. I want to foster a relationship with you as a reliable mentor for all your automotive needs. Happy customers make my job worthwhile, and that’s something money can’t buy.

If you’d like to get a great deal on your next vehicle, contact me and I’ll be happy to work with you. And if you’re eager to get off on the right foot, a smile in an email is as good as a smile in person. 🙂